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Kingston Concerned About the LVEC
Currently known as the "KROCK Centre"
Formerly the "Kingston Regional Sports and Entertainment Centre" or KRSEC
Formerly the "Large Venue Entertainment Centre" or LVEC
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Daily Points on Anglin Bay Site Traffic and Parking, #12
Acceptable Walking Distance and The Corel Centre

Beginning May 19th, 2005, Bruce Todd, who is supposed to be retired from a 40+ year career in traffic engineering, but nonetheless branded an "instant expert" by several pro-LVEC luminaries, none loftier than William Leggett, ex-principal of Queen's University, is briefing everyone about the field, pointing out "features" of the full Phase I Traffic and Parking Study prepared by CastleGlenn Consultants , who were hand-picked by Don Gedge for their "keen understanding of the Wellington Street Corridor" (pages 13 and 16 therein). 

Articles in the Daily Points on LVEC Traffic and Parking series

#1 - Concerns About the Content of Phase I (May 19)
#2 - No  Pedestrian Counts in Intersection Analysis (May 20)
#3 - A Discussion of the Two Adjacent Parking Lots (May 21)
#4 - Drop Off and Pick Up Mode of Access (May 22)
#5 - Display Maps (May 23)
#6 - The Anglin Parking Lot (May 24)
#7 - Reporting of Available On-Street Parking (May 25)
#8 - Determination of Mode of Travel (May 26)
#9 - Infrastructure and Management Requirements (May 27)
#10- Study Area and Study Data (May 28)
#11- Traffic Counts (May 29)
#12- Acceptable Walking Distance (May 30)
#13- Parking Availability and Key Factors (May 31)
#14- Clearance Time After an Event (June 1)
From: Bruce Todd
To: "Gedge, Don" <dgedge@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor S Garrison <sgarrison@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor R Downes <rdownes@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor L Foster <lfoster@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor G Stoparczyk <gstoparczyk@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor B Pater <bpater@cityofkingston.ca>, Mayor H Rosen <hrosen@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor G Beavis <gbeavis@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor K George <kgeorge@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor G Sutherland <gsutherland@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor F Patterson <fpatterson@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor E Smith <esmith@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor S Meers <smeers@cityofkingston.ca>, Councillor B George <bgeorge@cityofkingston.ca>
CC: "Hickey, Sheila" <SHickey@cityofkingston.ca>, "Baldwin, Derek" <dbaldwin@thewhig.com>, gwallace@cityofkingston.ca

Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 05:49:20
Subject: [KCAL] LVEC Traffic & Parking - Item #12    

Acceptable Walking Distance and The Corel Centre

Several people have stated at public meetings that they can walk from here to there in so many minutes.

Walking speeds are an important factor in traffic engineering. For instance, they help the traffic engineer/analyst determine how much time should be allotted at an intersection, controlled by a traffic control signal, for people to cross an artery/street. By observing and measuring people's movements in cities and towns across the country for many years, walking speeds of healthy males, healthy females, children, mixed crowds, etc, have been calculated and applied to a number of situations such as intersection crossings.

But, walking to a venue such as downtown stores, a theatre, a sports stadium, etc., is a different measure, a different pedestrian observation. This measure is called acceptable walking distance, or tolerable walking distance. Pedestrians have been observed over the years to find out how far they are willing to walk from their cars to their destination.

One of the components of acceptable walking distance is compulsory versus discretionary walking. People will walk further from their car to their workplace (compulsory) than they will from their car to a concert (discretionary).

Go to this website - http://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm89.htm
and scroll down just a little bit to Table 2 - Acceptable Walking Distances. Here, British Columbia's Victoria Transport Policy Institute presents a table of acceptable walking distances to various venues. Note the LONG WALK distance of 1600 feet (or 488 metres) to major sports venues. Observe the note at the bottom of the chart about adjusting these distances downward for various conditions.

Geographic Considerations

Shared Parking is limited by the proximity of destinations that share a parking facility. Exactly how close they must be depends on the type of land use and the type of user. Table 2 summarizes acceptable walking distances for various types of activities. Acceptable walking distance is also affected by the quality of the pedestrian environment, climate, line of site (longer distances are acceptable if people can see their destination), and “friction” (barriers along the way, such as crossing busy traffic).

Table 2          Acceptable Walking Distances (Parking Evaluation)

Adjacent
(Less than 100 ft.)

Short
(less than 800 ft)

Medium
(less than 1,200 ft)

Long
(less than 1,600 ft.)

People with disabilities

Deliveries and loading

Emergency services

Convenience store

 

Grocery stores

Professional services

Medical clinics

Residents

 

General retail

Restaurant

Employees

Entertainment center

Religious institution

Airport parking

Major sport or cultural event

Overflow parking

 

This table indicates maximum acceptable walking distance from parking to destinations for various activities and users. It assumes good pedestrian conditions (sidewalks, crosswalks, level terrain) that are outdoors and uncovered, with a mild climate.

Please note that I am not saying this - traffic engineering groups across our country are saying this.

Mr Arthur Gordon was asked point blank at the public meeting in Memorial Hall on May 18 how far it is to walk at the Corel Centre from the furthest point in their parking lot to the main entrance of the building. His answer was, about 600 metres. WRONG!

I took a trip to Ottawa recently and measured the distance from the furthest point in the Corel Centre parking lot to the main Gate, Gate 1 East. I talked to a gentleman by the name of Tim somebody - his Corel Centre office phone number is 1-613-599-0144. I asked him which parking lots were furthest from the main door that people come to, to enter the facility. He told me Parking Lot 9. I drove around the various parking lots and determined he was right, Parking Lot 9C is the furthest away from Gate 1. I measured from the furthest point in Lot 9C from the Corel Centre to Gate 1. I had to zigzag a bit because there are chain link fences surrounding parts of the parking lots, probably to control crowd movement.

Picture 1. The view from parking lot 9 at the Corel Centre.  From the nearest exit, this is a 507m WALKING distance.

Picture 2. The location of lot 9 at the Corel Centre.  The parking lot on the lower right is not Corel Centre parking.

The distance I measured with a trumeter was 1665 feet (or 507 metres), including, remember, a bit of zigzagging.

Mr Arthur Gordon continues to give INCORRECT DATA to the citizens of this community.

For all intents and purposes, THE COREL CENTRE CONFORMS EXACTLY TO THE ACCEPTABLE WALKING DISTANCES PROVIDED BY THE VICTORIA TRANSPORT POLICY INSTITUTE.

The people who designed the Corel Centre parking lots are following the exact standards and researched data of how far pedestrians are willing to walk. Why is Mr Gordon of CastleGlenn Consultants ignoring researched data and standard practices?

Here is what a 500m walking envelope, and a 500m radius circle, around the proposed LVEC location.

Diagram 1: A 500m WALKING distance envelope, and 500m radius, around the proposed LVEC location.  The edge of the blue irregularly-shaped envelope represents a the worst-possible-parking-deal scenario at the Corel Centre.  The proposed LVEC's value proposition is double this, as the (improperly centered) 850m radius, "10 minute walk" circle being circulated by the BIA reaches beyond Johnson street at Wellington.

Bruce.

P.S. Feedback notes (excluding congrats) to date - from local citizens = 19 ; from city hall, council, or other = 1

Articles in the Daily Points on LVEC Traffic and Parking series

#1 - Concerns About the Content of Phase I (May 19)
#2 - No  Pedestrian Counts in Intersection Analysis (May 20)
#3 - A Discussion of the Two Adjacent Parking Lots (May 21)
#4 - Drop Off and Pick Up Mode of Access (May 22)
#5 - Display Maps (May 23)
#6 - The Anglin Parking Lot (May 24)
#7 - Reporting of Available On-Street Parking (May 25)
#8 - Determination of Mode of Travel (May 26)
#9 - Infrastructure and Management Requirements (May 27)
#10- Study Area and Study Data (May 28)
#11- Traffic Counts (May 29)
#12- Acceptable Walking Distance (May 30)
#13- Parking Availability and Key Factors (May 31)
#14- Clearance Time After an Event (June 1)